Category Archives: Debt

Debt is a Four Letter Word

This page may include affiliate links. Please see the disclosure page for more information. For most of my adult life, I never really considered debt a four letter word. You know the type I mean. Those coarse, offensive type you start using as a teenager to act cool around your friends. I always viewed debt as a necessity, a…

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Debt is a Four Letter Word was first posted on September 27, 2019 at 8:25 am.
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How to Negotiate Your Medical Debt

Let’s face it: The worst thing about having to go to the hospital to receive medical treatment is being slammed with a huge bill afterwards. Sometimes, these medical bills are so expensive that you simply don’t have the means to pull it off right away, especially without health insurance. While we may find it easier in the short term to pretend that our unpaid medical bills don’t exist, avoiding the problem could only make it worse. Many medical providers are aware of this, which is why there are ways that you can negotiate your medical debt when you are unable to pay in full. In this article, we will discuss the different ways you can go about taking care of those medical expenses so that they don’t stack up later and wreak havoc on your credit.

Negotiate for insurance rates

Without health insurance, you’ll most likely be charged a much steeper price. If you want to negotiate your medical bills, one thing you can do is research what the fair market value is for whatever treatments you received. Usually, this is the price that insurance companies have to pay medical providers, and most of the time, it’s a lot cheaper.

Once you’ve found the dollar amount you’d like to ask for, you will need to get in touch with the billing department. If the person on the phone turns you down, ask to speak to their supervisor. It’s important to remain calm and polite while doing this but be persistent. Continue to ask to speak to a higher ranking individual until you reach someone who agrees to make a deal with you.

Pay it in cash

Cash payments are hard to turn down in most cases. if you want to negotiate a lower price on medical bills, you can offer to make a cash payment. Call your medical provider or the billing department and ask them if they would be willing to knock down the price of your bills if you were to pay in cash. Explain to them that if they can’t offer you any other sort of financial assistance, then this is another route you can take.

Not only will this save them money on credit card fees and hours worked by office employees, but it will also save time spent on processing paperwork. This is a smart offer to make, as instant cash payments as opposed to electronic payments are a lot harder to say no to for any business or institution.

Ask for a payment plan

There’s a good chance that even after you’ve asked for a lower price and offered to pay in cash, your medical provider will be unwilling to give you a deal. When this happens, there is still one more thing you can try. Before readily handing over your credit card, ask them if you can make payments on your bill. Most companies will allow you to do this and are used to working with people who are unable to pay their bills in full. Be honest about how much you are able to pay at a time.

It’s likely that they will try to negotiate a higher payment amount, but politely tell them that it’s not feasible for you. Most of the time, they will be understanding and take whatever payment they can get. If you’re struggling financially, making small payments on your medical bills is the best way to go to keep your credit score in tact. As long as you are making payments on your bills, the companies will not report you to the credit bureaus.

Take precautionary measures

A lot of medical providers and medical facilities have programs that offer financial assistance, but you are going to have to ask them for it. Be transparent at the time of or even before your medical treatment occurs. If the treatment you are seeking is not a medical emergency, ask ahead of time if there is a cheaper option or if you can get a discount. If you don’t have health insurance, this needs to be explained as early on as possible. Let your doctor know if you are living off of low income or if you are in the midst of some other type of financial hardship that is keeping you from being able to pay for service.

If you are successful in negotiating your medical bills, you might want to get it in writing so that you have proof. In some cases, you may even want to make your request in writing so that you have it on record in case anything goes wrong later. Once a deal has been agreed upon by both you and the medical provider or billing department, type up a summary of the conversation including key details of who you spoke to and the prices that were negotiated.

Other options for paying bills

There is no one-size-fits-all way of clearing your medical bills once and for all.  Some people have insurance, some can afford to pay in full, and some are going to have to negotiate a lower price. If you have already tried negotiating medical bills and were unsuccessful, there are other options to explore. Here are some other ways you can go about paying your medical bills:

  • Medical credit cards: There’s no guarantee that your medical provider will accept a payment plan. However, most of the time, they will accept payment with the use of a medical credit card. If you have no other choice, ask your doctor’s office about how you can apply for a medical credit card. Usually, you are able to apply at the office right then and there. Most medical credit cards offer zero interest for up to 12 months. If you can manage to pay off the medical debt within that timeframe, then perhaps a medical credit card is a good choice for you. Be wary of this if you already have poor credit.
  • Personal loan: If you’ve already been through all of your other options and were unable to make something work, it might be time to look at taking out a type of unsecured credit, such as a personal loan. If you have a significant amount of medical debt looming over your head, this might be a good idea as you can usually take out anywhere from $1,000 to $100,000. Once again, if you don’t have a good history with using credit, seriously consider the pros and cons of doing this.
  • Interest free credit card: If you don’t end up qualifying for a payment plan or a medical credit card, you can use a 0% interest credit card to pay the tab as long as you have good or outstanding credit.
  • Hire a medical bill advocate: If you feel overwhelmed by the task of reading through your medical bills and looking for errors, you can hire a professional to do it for you. Medical bill advocates are familiar with common procedures and the prices of treatments. If you have been wrongfully charged or overcharged, a medical bill advocate will be able to find this right away. Aside from pinpointing any errors, experts in medical bills will also do the negotiating for you.

Final Thoughts

If you are feeling overwhelmed by a large medical bill, remember that you have several options for taking care of it. It might be tempting to ignore the bill altogether but doing this could really damage your credit. Being honest with your medical provider from the beginning can prevent you from having to deal with extra costs. However, sometimes medical bills are ineveitable and we have to pay them. Consider payment plans or a medical credit card, but whatever you do, don’t let your unpaid medical bills be a show stopper!

How to Negotiate Your Medical Debt is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Budgeting For Beginners: A FREE Five Day Quick Start Course

The post Budgeting For Beginners: A FREE Five Day Quick Start Course appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Learn How to Budget

 

If you feel stress about money, worry about paying your bills or are just tired of trying to find a way to rob Peter to pay Paul, you aren’t alone.  In fact, I get it.

I really get it.

I tried to figure it all out on my own and failed miserably. That lead me to declare bankruptcy.  While it wasn’t my finest moment, it had to happen to lead me to the place I am today.

Sometimes, our biggest mistakes force us to learn the most.  For me, thinking that I could just try to wash my hands of my financial problems was mine.  I did not take the time to figure out the right way to get control over my money and stay out of debt. Bankruptcy was the easy solution – but the wrong one.

Before filing, I had tried it all.  I organized my bills to pay them on time. I worked with debt consolidation companies to try to lower my payments. I put spending freezes in place, just to blow that a few days later.

Nothing I had done was working.

So, I did what I thought was right. I contacted an attorney and filed.

As I said, that wasn’t the answer for me.  I never took the time to get to the root of why I was looking at money the way I did.  I did not want to face my own demons head-on.  And that lead me to build up more debt…..even after bankruptcy.

Once my bankruptcy was behind me, I married my husband.  We both knew that I wanted to stay home and raise our children.  We thought that we would be OK when I quit my job, after all, my husband had a good income.

Boy.  Were we wrong.

After our daughter was born, reality set in.  The truth is, we did not really know where we were spending our money and continued to live the same lifestyle, even though our income had dropped.

Our finances were a mess.

Then, one night, after a rare dinner out with friends, the light bulb came on.  Both of us realized that we could make some changes.

From that moment on, things were different.  We both had revelations:

  • We figured out we had to have a budget.
  • We learned why we were spending.
  • We worked together to create an actionable plan.
  • We were on the same team and found new ways to save more money than ever before.
  • We had a financial plan in place.

For us, it was our REBOOT moment.  When we took control of our finances, it was like we started living again.  When we stopped trying to hard to fight it and allowed ourselves to be vulnerable to change, it happened.

This is true for anyone who wants to learn how to budget.  You have to allow yourself to be open to the change.  You need to be willing to try something new.  After all, what you are currently doing isn’t working, is it?  What more have you got to lose?

That’s where the Free Five Day Money Management Course can help. This is a simple course that anyone can take – no matter your financial situation.

You will learn:

  • How to understand your own attitude towards money
  • Really see where you spend every penny you make
  • Create a workable budget
  • Develop a plan to dig yourself out from debt
  • Finally feel in control of your finances

Like I said above, this is free.  I will not charge you a dime to take the course. Your first lesson will arrive in your inbox tomorrow morning, so you can wake up and be ready to jump in and learn.

Best of all, I’m here with you.

You aren’t alone.

Sign up now and take control of your finances. What have you got to lose?

The post Budgeting For Beginners: A FREE Five Day Quick Start Course appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring?

How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring?

There’s nothing like falling in love and finding the person you want to spend the rest of your life with. But when it’s time to shop for rings, it’s easy to get discouraged by the price tags. Just how much should you spend on an engagement ring? We’ll dive into the topic and discuss ways to save on the big purchase.

Find out not: How much do I need to save for retirement?

What the Average Engagement Ring Costs

Maybe you can’t buy love. But if you’re in the market for an engagement ring, you’ll quickly realize that it won’t be cheap. According to the Knot’s 2016 Real Weddings Study, Americans spent an average of $6,163 on engagement rings, up from $5,871 in 2015. Wedding bands for the bride and engagement rings combined cost between $5,968 and $6,258.

If you want your wedding to happen sooner rather than later, keep in mind that on average, couples spend more than $30,000 to tie the knot. That’s roughly how much you can expect to pay for everything from your wedding reception and DJ to your cake and your photographer. Location matters when it comes to weddings, however, so you might be able to save some money by choosing a more affordable place to host your ceremony.

How Much Should I Spend?

How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring?

Conventional wisdom says that anyone planning to propose to their partner should prepare to spend at least two or three months of their salary on an engagement ring. But spending too much isn’t a good idea for various reasons.

A recent study conducted by Emory University connected pricey rings to divorce rates. Men who spent more money on rings for their fiancees were more likely to end their marriages. That’s a possible long-term consequence of overspending on an engagement ring. In the short term, using a large percentage of your money to buy a ring might prevent you from using those funds to pay bills or stay on top of your debt, which can hurt your credit score.

If the marriage doesn’t work out and your ex-spouse decides to sell their diamond engagement ring, its value won’t be nearly as high as it was when it was first purchased. That’s why diamond rings can be such bad investments.

So exactly how much should you spend on an engagement ring? It’s a good idea to make sure that the price you pay doesn’t prevent you or your partner from accomplishing whatever you’re planning to achieve in the future, whether that’s buying a house or having a child. Rather than following an old-school societal notion that says you should spend x amount of money on a ring, it’s best to spend an amount that won’t compromise your financial goals or jeopardize the status of your relationship.

How to Save on the Ring

If you don’t want the engagement ring you’re buying to break the bank, it’s a good idea to learn as much as you can about the rings and what makes some more expensive than others. Diamonds are the gems most commonly used in engagement rings, and if you’re buying one for your significant other, it’s important to familiarize yourself with what jewelers refer to as the four C’s: clarity, cut, color and carat weight.

In terms of clarity, the best diamonds are flawless, meaning that they don’t have any blemishes when viewed under a microscope with 10 power magnification. Since no one’s eyesight is that powerful, you can get away with choosing a diamond with a lower clarity grade that costs less. Getting a diamond that has fewer carats (meaning that it weighs less) or getting one that isn’t completely colorless can also lower its overall price.

Or don’t get a diamond at all. Your partner might be just as happy with a simple band, a white sapphire or an emerald ring and it probably won’t cost as much as a diamond engagement ring. Shopping for your ring at a vintage store, looking for one online rather than in-person and getting a ring with a series of smaller stones surrounding the center stone (also known as a halo ring) are a few additional ways to save when buying a ring.

Final Word

How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring?

There’s no need to spend a fortune on an engagement ring. And you don’t have to feel guilty about cutting corners in order to find one that you can afford to buy.

Like any other major purchase, it’s a good idea to take time to save up for a ring. If you have to take on more credit card debt or a personal loan in order to buy an engagement ring, it’s a good idea to find out how long it’ll take to pay off your debt. It isn’t wise to begin a marriage by digging yourself (and your partner) into a deep financial hole.

Tips for Getting Financially Ready for Marriage

  • If you haven’t already, start talking about money. It’s important to establish an open dialogue and make sure you understand and respect each other’s money values.
  • You might also consider sit down with a financial advisor before the big day. A financial advisor can help you identify your financial goals and come up with a financial plan for your life as a married couple. A matching tool (like ours) can help you find a person to work with to meet your needs. First you’ll answer a series of questions about your situation and goals. Then the program will narrow down your options from thousands of advisors to three fiduciaries who suit your needs. You can then read their profiles to learn more about them, interview them on the phone or in person and choose who to work with in the future. This allows you to find a good fit while the program does much of the hard work for you.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/sergey_b_a, ©iStock.com/svetikd, ©iStock.com/adamkaz

The post How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring? appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

8 Career Tips to Help You Crush Your Goals in 2021

Good riddance, 2020.

After one of the worst years of our lifetime, the ritual of setting New Year’s resolutions has taken on new meaning — especially when it comes to our financial lives. The pandemic erased the jobs of millions of Americans and docked the incomes of millions more.

But now is a time for forward thinking.

Instead of lamenting the past, we can apply a few lessons learned to make 2021 a much better year. (The bar is pretty low. We can only go up from here, right?)

1. Revisit Your Career Goals for 2020

Dig up your New Year’s resolutions from last year. If you didn’t commit them to paper (or a Google Doc) try to think back to the before times. You may have had some grandiose goal of landing your dream job or scoring a hefty raise.

Chances are you did not tick all those boxes. But as you sift through that list, look for any goals that can be salvaged. Then carry those goals over to 2021. Some tweaking may be required.

If nothing else, let this exercise provide a little comic relief. (How naive we were last New Year!)

2. Consider a Bridge Job

Bridge jobs can be a tool in helping you achieve a greater goal — even as you make a lateral but temporary career move.

Let’s say you had an epiphany and realized that your dream job is a creative director at a fancy advertising agency. You may not land the director position right off the bat. But you could gun for that junior graphic artist opening then work your way up.

Or, maybe you were in the hospitality industry and are still recovering from a layoff. You may not find the same job immediately. Instead, you could strategically use a seasonal job to fill the income void while you launch a concerted job hunt for a better match for your skills.

Here’s more on how bridge jobs can help you reach your career goals.

3. Optimize Your Resume

If you’re applying to a large company, chances are you’re doing it online and your resume is going to be reviewed by applicant tracking software (ATS) before any human sees it.

Basically, the software is a screener that scans your resume to see if you’re a good match for the position. It does that by matching skills and credentials mentioned in the job listing with your resume.

But if you didn’t optimize your resume properly, the ATS may not see you as a qualified candidate — even if you have the background the company is looking for.

Pro Tip

The trick is to make sure your resume uses similar phrases and wording from the job listing, aka resume keywords.

The format you choose for your resume is just as important. In certain cases, the standard chronological list of employment may not be the best choice. If you’re looking to change job fields or apply to a position for which you lack experience, career experts recommend using what’s called a functional resume: one that highlights your transferable skills and how those are a fit for the job you seek.

4. Jazz Up Your LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn can be a powerful, free tool for job seekers. If you signed up but let your profile languish without posting a headshot or work history, carve out a little time to jazz it up. Because that time can really pay off.

You can spruce up your LinkedIn profile in as little as 30 minutes. Here’s what you should do:

  • Customize your URL.
  • Choose a professional photo.
  • Craft a killer headline.
  • Write a recruiter-drawing summary.
  • Ask for recommendations from colleagues.

The professional social media site is especially useful when you’re researching a new employer. You can search for people who have worked for the company (past and present) to get a sense of its work culture. (Don’t be afraid to ask directly!) And if you’re invited to an interview, you can easily look up your interviewer(s).

During the pandemic, LinkedIn implemented a photo banner that you can add to your profile picture to let employers know you’re actively looking for work. For a more discreet approach, in the setting menu, you can toggle an “open to work” feature that only recruiters can see.

And that’s just scratching the surface.

5. Prepare for Virtual Job Recruitment

Virtual recruitment is the new normal. Even before the pandemic, online job fairs and interviews were steadily gaining popularity.

By attending fairs and interviewing virtually, you can connect with people you may never have otherwise had the opportunity to. It may sound a bit daunting at first, but we’ve all been collectively thrown into this remote environment at the same time. Hiring managers and recruiters may be working out the technical kinks themselves and are more likely to be forgiving.

Having strong remote-interviewing skills can be an easy way to set yourself apart. This quick interview advice can go a long way:

  • Adjust your lighting. If possible, include multiple light sources from different angles to eliminate any harsh shadows.
  • If you wear makeup, consider applying a little extra because it doesn’t show well on camera.
  • Position your web cam at eye level. (No one wants to see up your nose.) Stack a few books under your laptop if needed.
  • Have an interesting prop behind you. A bookshelf, plant or painting could work wonders.

6. Brush Up on Your Interviewing Skills

Even if you feel like a rockstar interviewer, you probably don’t know for sure unless you’ve watched a video of yourself during an interview (unlikely) or conducted a mock interview with a friend or family member (also doubtful). Having someone else critique your body language and provide honest feedback will help you address quirks you didn’t even know you had.

It’s good to make your mock interview experience as close to the real thing as possible. During the pandemic, that likely means a video call. Have the gracious soul you’ve convinced to assist you make note of technical aspects like lighting as well as the substantive things like how you answer questions and react under pressure.

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If you’re one of the millions of Americans who have slipped into long-term unemployment during the pandemic, that adds another layer to your interview you should prepare for: questions about your employment gap. You will likely be asked about your time out of work directly and possibly even in an accusatory manner. Have an honest, straightforward response ready and highlight any professional developments or new skills you’ve honed in the meantime.

7. Get Comfortable Negotiating

Your 2021 career goals aren’t likely to happen without a bit of legwork. Many career-related goals (raises, new jobs, better hours) boil down to one major thing: negotiation.

For most folks, negotiating can stir up some uncomfortable feelings. Those feelings are the first (and probably biggest) roadblock to getting what you want.

Once you’ve committed yourself to having those difficult conversations, do your homework. If your negotiation is income-related, research salary ranges for your position. Peg yourself on that scale based on your location, skills and experience.

Mentally set three numbers: a reserve point (the lowest number you’ll accept), a target point (the salary you want) and an anchor point (the first number to come up during the conversation). Use these numbers to create a game plan.

No matter the type of negotiation, it’s important to practice (maybe that same friend from your mock interview is available?) and to keep your composure. Stay calm, respectful and flexible and you’ll be ticking off those goals in no time.

8. Use a Side Gig Intentionally

Gig work can be a blessing or a curse depending on how you put it to use.

Blessing: extra income to help you meet a personal goal, like paying off debt or honing new skills that further your career. Curse: a seemingly never-ending grind and critical means of income from which there is no escape.

Sounds a little dramatic, sure. But the pandemic has really underscored this dichotomy. As millions of jobs have vanished, gig work — especially app-based services — has become a safety net. The work is fairly straightforward, entry-level and can be started in days.

Left uncheck, though, the gig you planned to do on Saturday evenings can slowly creep into Sundays. Then Mondays. Before you know it, most of your income is coming from a smattering of gig apps that have no real job security or benefits.

To avoid this scenario, set attainable financial or career goals, meet those goals and then get out. In other words, your side gig needs an exit plan.

Adam Hardy is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. He covers the gig economy, remote work and other unique ways to make money. Read his ​latest articles here, or say hi on Twitter @hardyjournalism.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

How To Save Money On Textbooks + Campus Book Rentals Review

How To Save Money On Textbooks + Campus Book Rentals ReviewIf you are looking for tips on how to save money as a college student, then one of the top things you need to learn is how to save money on textbooks such as through cheap textbook rentals. In this post, I will be including a Campus Book Rentals review because I used this textbook rental company throughout college and was able to save a great amount of money with cheap textbook rentals.

P.S. I also have a Campus Book Rentals coupon code at the end of the post, so do not miss out on this valuable Campus Book Rentals coupon for the best textbook rental company out there!

When I was in college, I always made sure to save as much money as I could. College is expensive, and everyone knows that. The costs can quickly add up. Between the tuition, lab fees, parking fees, textbook costs, and more, college costs can quickly get out of hand.

I know and understand this. I graduated with around $38,000 worth of student loan debt, and that was even with me carefully managing my costs. Thankfully I paid off my student loans (read about how I paid off my student loans within 7 months), but I do like to help others in as many ways as I can.

According to the National Association of College Stores, the average college student spends around $700 per year on the cost of textbooks.

That could be a total of a little less than $3,000 for a 4 year degree just for the cost of textbooks, and as everyone knows, the cost can actually be much higher than that.

I actually think this number that is estimated is wrong, because I don’t really know anyone who bought their college textbooks and only spent $350 or less from their college bookstore on the cost of textbooks. That wouldn’t have even covered two college textbooks for me from my college bookstore.

When I was in college, many of my college textbooks were around the $200 price for just one textbook, and I often took 7 or 8 classes a semester. This means if I paid full price for each book (whether I bought them online or from my college book store), I would have sometimes paid around $1,600 each SEMESTER!

Or $3,200 a YEAR!

That is just insane.

Below are my tips on the best ways to save money on college textbooks:

 

Rent your college textbooks through cheap textbook rental websites such as Campus Book Rentals.

When I was in college, I saved a great deal of money by renting my college textbooks. As I said above, college textbooks for me were expensive if I were to not shop around and just stick with the expensive books at the college bookstore. Who wants to waste a ton of money on the cost of textbooks by buying them at full price?

NOT ME! You can save a lot of money on the cost of textbooks by renting them instead.

I often rented my college textbooks that were $200 at my college bookstore for less than $50 for the semester. There are definitely some cheap textbook rentals out there!

I often found cheap textbook rentals for $25 as well That is a STEAL! I always used coupon codes as well, as they can be found everywhere. Lucky you, if you keep reading I have a CampusBook Rentals coupon code as well! 🙂

It was easy to rent textbooks online. Here is the step by step process of renting textbooks online and my Campus Book Rentals review:

  • I just had to find my college textbooks online such as on CampusBookRentals. Campus Book Rentals is the best textbook rental I used when I was in college. They made it easy and have a large college textbook selection for students to choose from so that you find the exact textbook you need.
  • I would then order the textbook for whatever time frame I needed. You can usually rent them for 45 days, two months, a full semester, or even longer. The longer the time frame, the more expensive they are, of course.
  • I would use the textbook for a class. Of course, this is not a surprise!
  • Once you are done with the textbook, all you have to do is return it. You will be provided a return label, so the return shipping is absolutely free. You don’t have to worry about the textbook being outdated, a new edition being published, losing money, etc.

I also have a Campus Book Rentals coupon code for 5% off your total purchase plus FREE SHIPPING if you need one as well. I genuinely believe they are the best textbook rental company out there right now, or else I wouldn’t be writing this whale of a Campus Book Rentals review post. The Campus Book Rentals coupon code is snowfall5. All you have to do is click on my affiliate link (the Campus Book Rentals coupon code only works with the affiliate link) and once you are ready to check out, enter snowfall5 as the Campus Book Rentals promotional code.

 

Skip the college bookstore for cheap textbook rentals or buy textbooks used.

The college bookstore can be a big rip off. Sorry to everyone who has ever worked at one.

I have three college degrees, and have visited the college bookstore many times to compare prices, and I do not think there was a single occurrence where the price at the college bookstore was cheaper than the price I found somewhere else, such as through CampusBookRentals.

 

Sell your college textbooks.

Some of you might be saying, well why didn’t you just buy your textbooks used and then sell them back, instead of renting college textbooks? Well, this is because it often turned out that whenever I bought a textbook, the very next semester they would be considered “old” because a new edition would be published. No one really buys old editions of finance books as they are considered “outdated” by many professors.

However, there are many instances where selling your college textbooks can be a great idea, and you can make some money as well.  If you are looking to save money in college, then you should learn how to sell your college textbooks back so that they aren’t just hanging out in your house collecting dust.

Thank you for reading, I hope you enjoyed this Campus Book Rentals review and that you learned how to save money on textbooks and a new way on how to save money as a college student.

How do you save money on your college textbooks?

 

Campus Book Rentals coupon code for the best textbook rental company!

P.S. Here is the Campus Book Rentals coupon again as well since you took your time to read my Campus Book Rentals review. I have a Campus Book Rentals coupon code if you need one for even cheaper cheap textbook rentals. The discount will give you 5% off your total textbook purchase rental plus FREE SHIPPING. The Campus Book Rentals coupon code is snowfall5. All you have to do is click on my affiliate link (the Campus Book Rentals coupon code only works with the affiliate link) and once you are ready to check out, enter snowfall5 as the Campus Book Rentals promotional code. This coupon code is good until April 30, 2015, so you have plenty of time to use it for this semester’s classes.

 

The post How To Save Money On Textbooks + Campus Book Rentals Review appeared first on Making Sense Of Cents.

Source: makingsenseofcents.com